Power is a health and social justice issue

A new animation highlights the role of “power” as a health and social justice issue.

Power as a health and social justice issue’ has been developed through a collaboration between Glasgow Centre for Population Health (GCPH) and NHS Health Scotland. It builds on NHS Health Scotland’s work on the theory and evidence relating to power as a fundamental cause of health inequalities and GCPH’s work on community engagement and empowerment.

The animation aims to be useful to people working in the public and third sectors to increase understanding of the importance of power in shaping social and health inequalities and encourage consideration of how communities can be supported to have more power.

This is particularly timely as plans to implement the Community Empowerment (Scotland) Act are developing. The animation is a tool that can help stimulate further discussion about the opportunities that the Act brings to share power more equally in communities across Scotland.

 

 

Video: “A fairer healthier Scotland – leading for change”

Earlier this year, the Scottish Government, NHS Health Scotland, the Scottish Human Rights Commission, the Health and Social Care Alliance Scotland (the ALLIANCE), and the University of Strathclyde Centre for Health Policy co-hosted a seminar on human rights based approaches to health and social care.

The purpose was to bring senior civil servants together with a number of agencies promoting human rights based approaches towards a fairer and a healthier Scotland. The seminar built on the First Minister’s commitment made in December 2015 to “do even more and be even better at incorporating human rights in making policy and delivering services” .

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Podcast: Taking the right approach

PODCAST: What role do human rights play in the context of health and social care?

The ALLIANCE’s Assistant Director for Policy and Communications, Andrew Strong recently spoke to SCVO as part of their “Right Approach” campaign, which aims shine a spotlight on how charities and campaign organisations across Scotland are following a human rights-based approach.

Find out more about the campaign by visiting the SCVO website or by following the hashtag #RightApproach on Twitter.

Bringing Human Rights Home

Over the last nine months Scottish Care has published two human rights documents, the Convention on the Rights of Residents in Care Homes for Adults and Older People and two weeks ago at the annual Care at Home and Housing Support Conference, the Convention on the Rights of People receiving Care at Home and Housing Support Services. Both were products of collaborative work where individuals who used support services articulated their sense of what constituted for them basic rights and quality in service provision.

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Looking back on the DECLARATION Health and Human Rights festival

The Health and Social Care Alliance Scotland (the ALLIANCE), NHS Health Scotland, the Mental Health Foundation and the Centre for Health Policy at Strathclyde University joined forces earlier this year to host the DECLARATION health and human rights festival.

The programme featured over 30 events and saw over 1,000 attendances over the four days to a mixture of film screenings, performances, debates, workshops and provocations. Each event was inspired by one of the 30 articles in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, with a focus on how human rights and the right to health come alive in Scotland today.

For those of you that weren’t able to make it along, keep your eye on www.declarationfest.com/news for a range of articles, podcasts and videos from the event.

Participatory Research – Health and Human Rights

Peer Research

We are a group of 5 volunteers at Glasgow Homelessness Network who were given the opportunity to take part in research that tries to better understand the experiences of people who struggle to achieve equal rights of access to health services or good health because of other circumstances in their lives.

We hadn’t done much research before and we got to work with the University of Strathclyde and the ALLIANCE who provided us with a lot of training and support to build research skills, work out what questions to ask, how to ask them, and we all had ideas about where we could go to speak to people who were experiencing homelessness.

We’ve finished our training and here are some of our thoughts.

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